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Each week on “I’m a Millionaire, So Now What?”, Colleen O’Connell-Campbell, Wealth Advisor at RBC Dominion Securities, delivers inspirational stories and practical advice to self-made millionaires and wealthy families. With a focus on financial planning and wealth management strategies, Colleen and her guests cover the critical issues that truly matter to you, including succession strategies, family business governance tips, how to cope with fundraiser fatigue, finding your purpose after losing your family business, and much more.

Aug 18, 2020

On this week’s “I’m a Millionaire. So Now What?” I revisit an episode from February.

 

Remember February? Pre-Covid-19 February? 🦠😭💸

 

I was all set to launch Double to Sell, a workshop for business owners wanting a cash rich exit strategy.

 

Cameron Herold, AKA the CEO Whisperer, was booked as featured speaker and workshop leader.

 

Then 💥BOOM💥that all went out the window. But it’s BACK! Virtually, of course, on Nov 4 & 5 (info here).

 

With the event nearing, I thought he deserved an anticipatory Millionaire rerun!  

 

Cameron Herold has a HUGE business brain, shakes the status quo, and shares a dirty little secret: business can actually be quite simple.

 

Enjoy the episode, hope to see you at the event!

 

 

Cameron Herold had 14 different little businesses by the age of 18. A born entrepreneur, he knew he loved money and loved business. By 20 years old, he owned a franchise business painting houses and had twelve employees. He spent his twenties and early 30’s heading up 3 large businesses and coaching over 120 entrepreneurs. One of whom was Kimball Musk, Elon Musk’s brother. In fact, Herold was a reference for their first round of funding in 1995. When he landed at 1-800-Got Junk? at the age of 35, he was their 14th employee. In six years as COO, the company grew from $2 million to $106 million, was operating in four countries and 330 cities, and earned second spot on the Canadian “best place to work” list. Something Herold, a firm believer in the power of company culture, considers one of his greatest accomplishments.